Saturday, May 23, 2020

The Role Of Self Esteem And Consumer Behavior - 1025 Words

The aim of this essay is to explain the role of self-esteem in consumer behaviour. In order to understand this concept, I will firstly explain the basic definitions related to self-esteem. Secondly, I will identify the importance of self-esteem when segmenting and positioning within a market; through two marketing appeals. One focusing on high self-esteem and the other explaining low self-esteem. Lastly, I will evaluate the managerial and consumer implications from the examples selected. As a result, this essay might advocate distinct approaches to reach consumers with high and low self-esteem, more effectively. Throughout the years, marketers have utilised the external environment as a resource for addressing consumer’s desires. However, marketers have less control upon external changes. As a result, vendors have managed to understand the consumer’s black box, that is, the characteristics and the decision process consumers have when buying products or services (Armstrong and Kotler, 2014). In this way, marketers can deliver and fulfil the needs and desires of their segmented consumers. For example, when buying a car certain personal characteristics, such as being innovative or luxurious affect individuals’ decision process (Deloitte, 2014). Moreover, the personal characteristics entail the self-concept. Similarly, the self-concept which reflects what you know about yourself; encompasses the self-esteem (Armstrong and Kotler, 2014; Solomon et al. 2015; Leonard, et al.Show MoreRelatedFun Made in Ducna1484 Words   |  6 Pages | | | |Use the document from: | |_ Principle of Marketing – Chap 5: Consumer market and Consumer Buyer Behavior | |_ website: http://www.mypursuitofhappiness.com | | | | Read MoreThe Problem Of Self Esteem1180 Words   |  5 Pagesproblems in the current society. On the other self-esteem is one of the most important variables that have a significant influence on these challenges. This research aims to investigate the role of self-esteem in peoples with the tendency to addiction, prostitution, as well as theft in Kerman city, Iran. The paper is divided into various sections starting from introduction, literature review, finding and conclusion. Introduction Self-esteem is all about the thought feeling and emotionRead MoreGender Stereotypes In Disney Princess Culture1356 Words   |  6 Pagesrisks to a child’s behavioral development rises. While princess culture is harmless in moderation, if children are not exposed to interests outside of the princess lifestyle, they have a greater risk of allowing gender stereotypes to shape their behavior and self-image. In the article Girls on Film: The Real Problem with the Disney Princess Brand, Monika Bartyzel, the creator of Girls on Film at theweek.com, used a professional tone to argue that Disney’s princess culture severely limits what characteristicsRead MoreSelf Image Self Esteem, Consumer Behavior, Personality Advertisement1632 Words   |  7 Pageswww.imis.ac.in Study Note @ Consumer Behavior Do advertisements influence our self image and our self esteem? Some critics accuse marketers of systematically creating anxiety, promoting envy, and fostering feelings of inadequacy and insecurity to sell us their products. Marketers respond that advertising does nothing more than mirror societys values, alerts people to new products and bargains, or motivate people to switch brands. At the very worst, they say, it bores or annoys. Of course, some adsRead MoreLiving Out the Reality of Others?1478 Words   |  6 Pages â€Å"Insults, temper tantrums, selfishness, gross behavior, and pl ain old stupidity—these are the main ingredients for most of today’s reality TV shows. Guess who’s watching them? Millions of young people†¦Ã¢â‚¬  (Ilisa Cohen, 14). The world is changing in many different ways and people are influenced by many different situations. Teenagers are however, easily influenced by the good, the bad, and the reality. Not only are teenagers observing from the reality around them, but reality that is shown onRead MoreConstruct Development and Scale Creation Essay1465 Words   |  6 PagesCreation Choose a construct you would like to measure. I picked self-confidence. According to Brown (2004) self confidence is defined as ones ability to rely on themselves, to assert oneself socially, regarding what one thinks and possessing the skills to work independently, based on ones learning from personal experience and the ability to make use of prior knowledge. Self confidence measures include self efficacy, self esteem, knowledge and ability to work out problem situations and make informedRead MoreMass Media Effects on Women1721 Words   |  7 Pageswomen watch ideal or thin images of models in advertisement then they feel very unattractive compare to the models in commercials. They feel lower self-esteem and self-concept in them and it generates anxiety or depression in women. According to article† negative body image is associated with poor self-esteem, anxiety about social evaluation, public self-consciousness, depression, and sexual inhibition† (Choate 2005).†Images of models which have been digitally altered are causing more than two thirdsRead MoreE Commerce : Assignment Questions863 Words   |  4 PagesOperating system security enhancements, anti-virus software 3. What are the factors that Influence Consumers’ Buying Behavior also mention Stages in the Buying Process. the factors that Influence Consumers’ Buying Behavior I. Cultural factors: include a consumer’s culture, subculture and social class. II. Social factors: include groups (reference groups, aspirational groups and member groups), family, roles and status. III. Personal factors: include such variables as age and lifecycle stage, occupationRead MoreDo Name Brand Clothing Affect Children and Teens Lifestyles and Interactions With One Another? 1206 Words   |  5 Pageson Name Brand Clothing: According to the media name brand clothing does not impact teens because it helps improve their self-esteem. Some psychologists agree, that by improving their self -esteem they are also improving their confidence. Name brand clothing can give a teen the self-esteem they need while going through the awkward stage from childhood to adulthood. Self-esteem is positively associated with the importance given to the utilitarian aspects of clothing, and susceptibility to interpersonalRead MoreBuying Patterns and Behavior: Influencers Essay example1481 Words   |  6 PagesReview Part 1: Review Questions What is an opinion leader? Discuss how marketers attempt to use opinion leaders to help sell their products? Provide examples? Opinion leaders are individuals whose behavior and ideas are looked up to and are considered a model for others to base/reflect their own behavior and ideas or ideals and opinions on. These individuals have a way to influence others who follow them. Marketers attempt to use them to help sell their products for a particular target market most

Tuesday, May 12, 2020

The Theme Of Evil In Shakespeares Othello - 2010 Words

Just what is evil in Shakespeares play? Iagos will for revenge on Cassio, who has been promoted to a higher army rank than himself? Is Iago evil? Essentially, Iago could be described as the central trouble-making, ill-willed character of the play; he leads a lot of the characters into a state of confusion, convincing them to think poorly and wrong of other figures in Othello that are in fact innocent of their accused crimes. But does this make him an evil individual? Let us begin by defining the word evil. An evil person may be considered as somebody who condones bad or morally wrong activities that cause ruin, injury, misfortune or destruction. From this definition, it becomes clear to us that Iago could very well be taken on†¦show more content†¦True, he seeks revenge, but was it his original intentions that people were killed for the pursuit of his vengeance on Othello and Cassio? It is doubtful. At any given point in the play, Iago does what he thinks best to climb out of the current situation he stands in. Naturally in doing so, he digs his own grave deeper and deeper, not achieving the desired task, but only causing more confusion from the point of view of the other characters and thus leading to bleak suffering of all the persons mentioned in the character list of the play. From my point of view, Iago lacks any type of solid, convincing ground for his evil activities on the characters; he simply never backs up his actions with proper reasoning, clearly taking advantage of the vulnerable and uneasy atmosphere following the threat of invasion Cyprus finds itself in. For example, in the first scene he makes a claim to being angry at Othello for not having considered him worthy of promotion to lieutenant. (Act I Scene 1, lines 7-32) Additionally, at the end of Act I, Scene 3, Iago is under suspicion Othello has slept with his wife, Emilia: It is thought abroad that twixt my sheets, he has done my office. (Act I Scene 3, lines 369-370) This suspicion comes up again at the end of Act II, Scene 1 when we learn that he lusts after Desdemona purely because of his desire to get even with Othello, wife after wife (Act II Scene 1, line 286). These claims do not seem to show any properShow MoreRelatedTheme Of Monstrous Jealousy In William Shakespeares Othello1271 Wo rds   |  6 PagesWilliam Shakespeare’s â€Å"Othello†, illustrates four of themes in the play. One of the themes is extreme jealousy can make a person act like a monster. In the play, Shakespeare uses Othello, Roderigo, and Iago to prove the theme of Monstrous Jealousy by Othello slapping Desdemona in front of the Public of Venusians calling her cruel names and Developing evil schemes to kill Desdemona at night. Iago tells the lie to Othello about Cassio and Desdemona to and convincing Othello to believe in it. RoderigoRead MoreTheme Of Black And White In Othello1072 Words   |  5 PagesWilliam Shakespeare’s tragic play Othello is a tale of power, love, and deception. However, racial prejudice is also a critical component in the play’s larger assertations, and the abundance of black and white imagery throughout it suggests that white is synonymous with good and that black is synonymous with evil. As such, this imagery is vital to the play’s o verriding paradox, which is that Othello â€Å"is far more fair than black† (Shakespeare 1.3.285). To clarify, Shakespeare portrays Othello as inherentlyRead MoreOthello: Good vs Evil1525 Words   |  7 PagesGood Or Evil: A Critical Analysis of Othello’s Main Characters William Shakespeare’s Othello is a classic depiction of a struggle between good and evil. In the play,, the characters are faced with the choice to either conquer or succumb to the overpowering force of evil. Shakespeare places his characters on a sort of spectrum in which a character’s amount of god or evil can be represented by a shade of color: black representing pure evil, white representing absolute goodness, and a shade of greyRead More Rating Othello1404 Words   |  6 PagesRating Othello  Ã‚        Ã‚  Ã‚   Is this Shakespearean tragedy Othello at the top of the rating chart, or is it just near the top? And why? This essay intends to examine various aspects of this subject, along with critical opinion.    This play ranks near the top. The Bard’s presentation of emotions, character, of good and evil actions that are down-to-earth – these are sometimes seen as the main reasons for the high ranking of Othello. Louis B. Wright and Virginia A. LaMar in â€Å"The Engaging QualitiesRead MoreOthello Character Analysis1241 Words   |  5 PagesOthello, a play written in the setting of Venice City during a period of war between Venice and Turkey in the 16 century is one of the numerous William Shakespeare’s plays. Othello a middle-aged black moor who is also a general in the defense forces marries Desdemona, a white aristocratic lady against the wishes of her father. Their love, however, does not have the happily ever after ending due to the manipulations, deceptions, and scheming of Iago who is driven by revenge and selfish ambitions.Read MoreBetraying and Lying in Othello by William Shakespeare1726 Words   |  7 PagesBetraying and lying have become the root of all ev il today. People have made it an everyday thing to lie and betray people just because they like to see people broken in misery. People also lie and betray people because of jealousy they may have towards them. The tragedy of Othello explains why some people are not trustworthy. Just because some people feel like they are miserable, they try everything in their power to make the other individual miserable as well. Enemies come in different colorsRead MoreThemes in Othello Essays994 Words   |  4 PagesThemes in Shakespeares Othello Throughout Shakespeares play, Othello, there are many themes interwoven to describe the authors perspective of the true nature of a mans soul. Three themes critical to the play are doubt versus trust, monstrous imagery and the fallible love of man. One central theme of the play is the major contrast of doubt versus trust. For whatever reason, Othellos trust of Desdemona is too weak to resist Iagos accusations. As happens in many of Shakespeares works, miscommunicationRead MoreOthello Character Analysis1678 Words   |  7 Pagesdrama. Shakespeare’s masterpieces and tragedies such as Hamlet, Othello, Macbeth, King Lear and Romeo and Juliet caused a remarkable turning point in English literature as whole, and English drama in particular.His play Othellois one of his unforgettable tragedies. The play of Othello is the finest example of Shakespeare’s poetic and narrative style. Thus, Shakespeare is known as the most influential dramatist whose tragedies found the way to interact with the audience.Shakespeare’s Othello is aboutRead MoreEssay on The Theme of Self Esteem in Othello1475 Words   |  6 PagesThe Theme of Self Esteem in Othello For the theater-going people of the Elizabethan age, there were many hardships. Many of them experienced poor living conditions and treatment. All of them faced the dangers of a comparatively underdeveloped medical knowledge which often left the young and elderly to die of common diseases. The magic of Shakespeare is not only that historians can learn of otherwise undocumented details of the 1500s, but also that all readers can discover the many similaritiesRead MoreEssay about Jealousy in Shakespeares Othello1581 Words   |  7 PagesJealousy in Othello  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚        Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚   Shakespeare is known for his exceptional ability to compose plays full of deceit, trickery, revenge, and jealousy. The play Othello, evolves around the theme of jealousy.    One of Shakespeares most credible characteristics in his writing is his ability to compose a play in which has a story that originates, and strides on lies. As theses lies were unraveled the central theme of his play became distinct, and clearly visible. The central theme was based

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Inspiration and Authority Free Essays

World religions such as Christianity, Judaism and Islam both today and throughout history have been directly linked to inspired scriptures. It is from these scriptures that observers can derive a sense of inspiration and a force of divine authority, with the parables and teachings of the holy doctrines pronouncing the will of God. This is the simple proposition that begins this difficult discussion on the different ways that we may understand, interpret and ultimately deduce truth in the experience of engaging the scriptures. We will write a custom essay sample on Inspiration and Authority or any similar topic only for you Order Now Given that the subject of this discussion is the true to be verified in the Bible, the Christian faith, and to a lesser extent the Jewish faith, will be used for consideration here. In divining ‘truth,’ we must first recognize that an understanding of religious scriptures varies across a great spectrum of Christians, with the shared experience of inspiration giving way to an underlying diversity of opinions on what is being instructed or to what extent ‘facts’ reported in the Bible may be accepted as such. These opinions concern such things as the authorship of the scriptures, the role of the prophets and the certainty held in the words of scripture themselves, which when held together establish a degree truth which is itself often in the eye or heart of the beholder. All of these issues are related to the point of view from which one approaches the content of the Bible, whether it be one of conservative interpretation or of liberal understanding. For those who take a conservative perspective on the scriptures, Achtemeier (1980) identifies these as individuals who generally believe that the authority of the scriptures descends from the fact that they were inspired directly by God. This is to say that to the conservative Christian, the source of the text appears to be God’s direct intervention in human events through those that are identified as prophets, predisposing assumptions to recognize an incontrovertible degree of truth in the words of the Bible. The logic is generally held that inspiration â€Å"implies that the Bible is authoritative for all humanity in all aspects of life. Unless the Bible is truly inspired by God, there is no reason why it should be considered any more authoritative than any other book. These are said to be endowed with the divine inspiration which allows them to offer dictation of the events. † (Kulikovsky, 1) This is a view which resonates with the historical and biblical conception of prophecy. Prophecy would play a very important part in the early development of the Christian philosophy. Such a claim is supported by Longman (2007), who states that â€Å"the prophetic role in public evangelism grew from the Old Testament prophecies of an outpouring of the Spirit. Prophets are consistently valued highly among the churchly ‘offices’ or roles, and prophecy is rated chief and most prized among the gifts. The New Testament-era church was more dependent on the prophetic gift for giving it direction (Acts 13 and 15). † (Longman, 1) This is because prophecy is seen as carrying the direct word of God, the distinct source of inspiration, authority and truth. However, there are some interesting considerations which come through in the textual analysis that warrant further scrutiny. In particular, the conceptual issue of inerrancy helps to provide some new insights into the ways that we should understand the history of the Bible and its aspiration toward the reflection of truth. Inerrancy is the theory which states that the divine inspiration conservatively believed to be at the base of the bible’s words determines that all of these words are inherently true. This means that the scriptures’ report on history, both mortal and divine, is to be understood as true to the last letter. This is a view that modern scholars have come more frequently to reconsider. A developing liberalism in the interpretation of the scriptures allows that even if it is believed they have been produced by human observation and interpretation of events, their value is no less great as a reflection of some higher truth. This is to say that it is no longer necessary to assume that every word of the bible must be understood as factually perfect but must instead be understood as authoritative in demonstrable intent, and therefore answering to a higher truth than simply that which is suggested by a proper detailed report of history. This view does allow a reading of the Bible which is more enabling to the modern observer, entitling an acceptance of the important truths concerning morality and divinity, without enforcing an unflinching approach to the historical report of the bible. This opens the floor for the divining of truth even in the presence of critical scrutiny. This is an idea which seems appropriate, with great individuality determining the way that inspiration is received and the way that truth is understood and, thereafter, manifested. This refers either to the prophet, the author or the reader of the scripture. For each, the receipt of inspiration from God many take any of an infinite number of forms. This is an appropriate maturation in the accommodation of Christian discourse to the needs of modern Christians, who come from many different lifestyles and dispositions to receive the words of God. This holds truth to a high standard that is nonetheless absent of rigidity. Still, there are reasons to concern ourselves with the danger to core Christian beliefs of too liberalist a stance on that which may be defined or read as truth. This is to say that â€Å"the risks of individualism and illuminism, an exclusive reliance on the authority of ‘inner testimony’† should be seen problematic to important cardinal tenets. Specifically, conservative Christians worry that â€Å"anything which suggested that Christ’s life and death were only, so to speak, a dramatized projection of the self’s inner history would be hard to reconcile with an orthodoxy concerned to defend the idea that God assumes real and particularly human existence in Jesus. † (Richardson, 304) As this constitutes a core belief, it is important for many Christians that even the origins of the scriptures reflect this same idea. Thus, historical truth must be taken in distinction, with so many of the details of the Bible based on allegorical narrative, with morality and lifestyle practice deeply couched in not just the words and principals, but even in the incidences and landmark moments of biblical account. Still, the liberalist perspective allows one to consider that it is not required to think of the scriptures in this way to find a defense of the concept of Jesus Christ as the son of God. It is less constructive, that is to say, to think of the scriptures as having been offered by direct inspiration than to think of them as demonstrating the inspiration of early Christianity. Historically speaking, there is an inherent truth to that which is implied by narrative accounting, with interpretation allowing us to at least reflect on inspiration for such major narrative moments as the path of Jesus. This is a functional achievement even without achieving the mark of inerrancy. To this end, our outside reading helps to support the case that the bible does not need to be considered a historical document in the way that we might look at a textbook (though even here, the field of historiography does ask us to define and contextually consider what ‘truth’ is. ) Instead, â€Å"the truthfulness of the Bible should be evaluated according to its own ‘usage and purpose. ’ Yet its purpose rarely includes details of history and science. † (Morrison, 1) These elements of history and science are usually considered byproducts that are revealed within the context of a larger story drawn from a specific time and place. This seems, increasingly a suitable way to understand the place from where our scriptures draw their authority as well, with very real truths about the Bible’s cultural origins emerging through even a skeptical reading. Achtmeier (1980) is particularly convincing on this subject because of the way in which his analysis treats the conservative view point. The author seems to be guided by the intent to show that conservative interpretations that demand an inerrant perspective actually do a disservice to the truthful value of the text. The grace of God and the way that this inspires the people are both hidden behind discussion about the accuracy of dates and details. This critique shows that this may not be the authority that was intended by the scriptures, which illuminate far more important truths about human spiritual history than physical history. Ultimately, this discourse establishes the rather liberal sense of the origin of the scriptures as relating to certain inherent truths which are visible now to a broad array of observers, whether spiritually connected or not. This is to say that the discussion here suggest that the truth that we find in scriptures is not a result of the direct intervention of God in the process of writing and also not as a result of being a perfectly accurate reflection of history. Instead, its relationship to truth shows that the scriptures are a suitable way of understanding how authority and inspiration translated faith in the early development of canon. This is a perspective which will help to ground an understanding of the core value of the Bible while also illuminating new and developing ways to understand their origins and history. Works Cited Achtemeier, Paul. (1980). Inspiration and Authority. Hendrickson Publishing. Kulilovsky, Andrew S. (1996). Inspiration, Authority and Interpretation. Kulikovsky Online. Ret. 4/22/08 http://www. kulikovskyonline. net/hermeneutics/inspirat. htm. Longman, Robert Jr. (2007). Prophecy in the New Testament. Spirit Home. Ret . 4/22/08 http://www. spirithome. com/prophist. html#ntproph Morrison, Michael. (2002). Inspiration, Authority, and Reliability of Scripture. Worldwide Church of God. Richardson, Alan John Bowden. (1983). The Westminster Dictionary of Christian Theology. Westminster John Knox Press. How to cite Inspiration and Authority, Papers

Inspiration and Authority Free Essays

World religions such as Christianity, Judaism and Islam both today and throughout history have been directly linked to inspired scriptures. It is from these scriptures that observers can derive a sense of inspiration and a force of divine authority, with the parables and teachings of the holy doctrines pronouncing the will of God. This is the simple proposition that begins this difficult discussion on the different ways that we may understand, interpret and ultimately deduce truth in the experience of engaging the scriptures. We will write a custom essay sample on Inspiration and Authority or any similar topic only for you Order Now Given that the subject of this discussion is the true to be verified in the Bible, the Christian faith, and to a lesser extent the Jewish faith, will be used for consideration here. In divining ‘truth,’ we must first recognize that an understanding of religious scriptures varies across a great spectrum of Christians, with the shared experience of inspiration giving way to an underlying diversity of opinions on what is being instructed or to what extent ‘facts’ reported in the Bible may be accepted as such. These opinions concern such things as the authorship of the scriptures, the role of the prophets and the certainty held in the words of scripture themselves, which when held together establish a degree truth which is itself often in the eye or heart of the beholder. All of these issues are related to the point of view from which one approaches the content of the Bible, whether it be one of conservative interpretation or of liberal understanding. For those who take a conservative perspective on the scriptures, Achtemeier (1980) identifies these as individuals who generally believe that the authority of the scriptures descends from the fact that they were inspired directly by God. This is to say that to the conservative Christian, the source of the text appears to be God’s direct intervention in human events through those that are identified as prophets, predisposing assumptions to recognize an incontrovertible degree of truth in the words of the Bible. The logic is generally held that inspiration â€Å"implies that the Bible is authoritative for all humanity in all aspects of life. Unless the Bible is truly inspired by God, there is no reason why it should be considered any more authoritative than any other book. These are said to be endowed with the divine inspiration which allows them to offer dictation of the events. † (Kulikovsky, 1) This is a view which resonates with the historical and biblical conception of prophecy. Prophecy would play a very important part in the early development of the Christian philosophy. Such a claim is supported by Longman (2007), who states that â€Å"the prophetic role in public evangelism grew from the Old Testament prophecies of an outpouring of the Spirit. Prophets are consistently valued highly among the churchly ‘offices’ or roles, and prophecy is rated chief and most prized among the gifts. The New Testament-era church was more dependent on the prophetic gift for giving it direction (Acts 13 and 15). † (Longman, 1) This is because prophecy is seen as carrying the direct word of God, the distinct source of inspiration, authority and truth. However, there are some interesting considerations which come through in the textual analysis that warrant further scrutiny. In particular, the conceptual issue of inerrancy helps to provide some new insights into the ways that we should understand the history of the Bible and its aspiration toward the reflection of truth. Inerrancy is the theory which states that the divine inspiration conservatively believed to be at the base of the bible’s words determines that all of these words are inherently true. This means that the scriptures’ report on history, both mortal and divine, is to be understood as true to the last letter. This is a view that modern scholars have come more frequently to reconsider. A developing liberalism in the interpretation of the scriptures allows that even if it is believed they have been produced by human observation and interpretation of events, their value is no less great as a reflection of some higher truth. This is to say that it is no longer necessary to assume that every word of the bible must be understood as factually perfect but must instead be understood as authoritative in demonstrable intent, and therefore answering to a higher truth than simply that which is suggested by a proper detailed report of history. This view does allow a reading of the Bible which is more enabling to the modern observer, entitling an acceptance of the important truths concerning morality and divinity, without enforcing an unflinching approach to the historical report of the bible. This opens the floor for the divining of truth even in the presence of critical scrutiny. This is an idea which seems appropriate, with great individuality determining the way that inspiration is received and the way that truth is understood and, thereafter, manifested. This refers either to the prophet, the author or the reader of the scripture. For each, the receipt of inspiration from God many take any of an infinite number of forms. This is an appropriate maturation in the accommodation of Christian discourse to the needs of modern Christians, who come from many different lifestyles and dispositions to receive the words of God. This holds truth to a high standard that is nonetheless absent of rigidity. Still, there are reasons to concern ourselves with the danger to core Christian beliefs of too liberalist a stance on that which may be defined or read as truth. This is to say that â€Å"the risks of individualism and illuminism, an exclusive reliance on the authority of ‘inner testimony’† should be seen problematic to important cardinal tenets. Specifically, conservative Christians worry that â€Å"anything which suggested that Christ’s life and death were only, so to speak, a dramatized projection of the self’s inner history would be hard to reconcile with an orthodoxy concerned to defend the idea that God assumes real and particularly human existence in Jesus. † (Richardson, 304) As this constitutes a core belief, it is important for many Christians that even the origins of the scriptures reflect this same idea. Thus, historical truth must be taken in distinction, with so many of the details of the Bible based on allegorical narrative, with morality and lifestyle practice deeply couched in not just the words and principals, but even in the incidences and landmark moments of biblical account. Still, the liberalist perspective allows one to consider that it is not required to think of the scriptures in this way to find a defense of the concept of Jesus Christ as the son of God. It is less constructive, that is to say, to think of the scriptures as having been offered by direct inspiration than to think of them as demonstrating the inspiration of early Christianity. Historically speaking, there is an inherent truth to that which is implied by narrative accounting, with interpretation allowing us to at least reflect on inspiration for such major narrative moments as the path of Jesus. This is a functional achievement even without achieving the mark of inerrancy. To this end, our outside reading helps to support the case that the bible does not need to be considered a historical document in the way that we might look at a textbook (though even here, the field of historiography does ask us to define and contextually consider what ‘truth’ is. ) Instead, â€Å"the truthfulness of the Bible should be evaluated according to its own ‘usage and purpose. ’ Yet its purpose rarely includes details of history and science. † (Morrison, 1) These elements of history and science are usually considered byproducts that are revealed within the context of a larger story drawn from a specific time and place. This seems, increasingly a suitable way to understand the place from where our scriptures draw their authority as well, with very real truths about the Bible’s cultural origins emerging through even a skeptical reading. Achtmeier (1980) is particularly convincing on this subject because of the way in which his analysis treats the conservative view point. The author seems to be guided by the intent to show that conservative interpretations that demand an inerrant perspective actually do a disservice to the truthful value of the text. The grace of God and the way that this inspires the people are both hidden behind discussion about the accuracy of dates and details. This critique shows that this may not be the authority that was intended by the scriptures, which illuminate far more important truths about human spiritual history than physical history. Ultimately, this discourse establishes the rather liberal sense of the origin of the scriptures as relating to certain inherent truths which are visible now to a broad array of observers, whether spiritually connected or not. This is to say that the discussion here suggest that the truth that we find in scriptures is not a result of the direct intervention of God in the process of writing and also not as a result of being a perfectly accurate reflection of history. Instead, its relationship to truth shows that the scriptures are a suitable way of understanding how authority and inspiration translated faith in the early development of canon. This is a perspective which will help to ground an understanding of the core value of the Bible while also illuminating new and developing ways to understand their origins and history. Works Cited Achtemeier, Paul. (1980). Inspiration and Authority. Hendrickson Publishing. Kulilovsky, Andrew S. (1996). Inspiration, Authority and Interpretation. Kulikovsky Online. Ret. 4/22/08 http://www. kulikovskyonline. net/hermeneutics/inspirat. htm. Longman, Robert Jr. (2007). Prophecy in the New Testament. Spirit Home. Ret . 4/22/08 http://www. spirithome. com/prophist. html#ntproph Morrison, Michael. (2002). Inspiration, Authority, and Reliability of Scripture. Worldwide Church of God. Richardson, Alan John Bowden. (1983). The Westminster Dictionary of Christian Theology. Westminster John Knox Press. How to cite Inspiration and Authority, Papers

Saturday, May 2, 2020

Managing Knowledge Networks Business Communication Quarterly

Question: Describe about the Managing Knowledge Networks for Business Communication Quarterly? Answer: Tax withholding: Exercise instruction Nature of this e-mail: This email is a kind of notice of the revised pay structure to the tax-payers. General Informational: Tax department An assignment is asking readers to do something: To pay the revised amount. A set of instruction: If the reader/taxpayer wants to review the entire changes in the federal tax withholding, and if he chooses to make changes to the federal tax withholding, he can incorporate the desired changes in Lawson Self-service (Mumford, 2015). The key point of this e-mail: make people aware of the changes in the federal withholding due to the changes in the tax law. One sentence to sum up the scenarios: The federal withholds table has been revised due to the changes in the Tax Law according to the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 and advises the reader to their review the changes in federal tax withholding and let the reader make changes to his/her federal tax withholding in Lawson Self-Service. A message to all the readers to get the quickly and let them take actions if necessary: As the changes took place in withholding table due to the changes in the tax law as per the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. The taxpayer must go through all the changes in pay structure and can also make changes to his/her tax withholding in Lawson Self-service (MORENO-GARCA, 2015). Work hours and schedule: Assignment a) Reason for writing this mail: Bill wrote this e-mail to clarify a 4-day working week or compressed week cannot be applied to all the areas and imposed some requirements to achieve compressed work week. b) Making outline of Bills objective. Bill mentioned his consideration over one of several related topics regarding Human Resources, which is compressed work week. Bill suggested scheduling meeting for all the staffs over the outlook and suggested to use the calendar feature in Outlook. Bill suggested updating each employees Outlook calendar. Bill suggested for making an analysis of the area where the compressed working week can be applied and where it is impossible to apply compressed week for work. Bill made a list consist of requirements that need to be met while applying the compressed work week. Bill informed everyone to make a schedule of meeting for all of the employees in outlook within the next day or within the coming two days (Okoro, 2011). c) Hierarchical list similar to Bills message: Yes, the under mentioned hierarchical structure matches with the hierarchy of bills objectives (Chalkiti, 2011). Bills consideration for the topic on Compressed Work Week. Arrangement of meetings, scheduled by the outlook. Understanding the area, where the idea of compressed work week can be applied. Imposing some requirements those need to be met for an effective compressed work schedule. d) Mode of Bills writing: Indirect order. e) Bills tone in this message: He was quite unsure about his employees and his tone was reflecting that. f) It was not showing disrespect anywhere in any of the paragraph of e-mail. References Chalkiti, K. (2011). Book Review: Managing Knowledge Networks. Business Communication Quarterly, 74(3), 378-380. doi:10.1177/1080569911415068 MORENO-GARC A, E. (2015). STRATEGIC EQUILIBRIA WITH PARTIALLY CONSUMABLE WITHHOLDINGS. International Game Theory Review, 08(04), 533-553. doi:10.1142/s0219198906001090 Mumford, A. (2015). Tax Complexity, Tax Salience and Tax Politics. Social Legal Studies, 24(2), 185-201. doi:10.1177/0964663915575192 Okoro, E. (2011). Book Review: Managing Performance Improvement. Business Communication Quarterly, 74(3), 372-377. doi:10.1177/1080569911414844

Tuesday, March 24, 2020

Living in a Faceless World free essay sample

Ben Dingman Period 2 October 2, 2012 Living in a Faceless World Imagine not being able to recognize your parents, living your everyday life at school and work, let alone recognizing yourself when you look into the mirror. Living in a Faceless World written by Joshua Davis is an article of how Brad Duchaine tries to solve the mystery of prosopagnosia. Fortunately, the majority of people don’t have to life with this condition. Duchaine’s first studies were on Zoe Hunn and Bill Choisser and how the condition affected their lives personally.Duchaine tried to help them learn more about their condition. Our parents most of the time pass down at least one trait that we are not too fond of. Unfortunately in Zoe Hunn’s life case, her father passed down prosopagnosia. Both of them just assumed they were bad with faces. Since Zoe couldn’t even recognize herself, she had no idea how gorgeous she was. We will write a custom essay sample on Living in a Faceless World or any similar topic specifically for you Do Not WasteYour Time HIRE WRITER Only 13.90 / page When she was fourteen years old, her friends convinced her to do a modeling contest with them; which she ended up winning. Her prize was an offer from a modeling agency. She ended up being signed by Models 1 in London.Whenever she looked at photos, she could never recognize or spot herself. Since she was completely unable to appreciate how beautiful she was, she decided to go see a doctor. When the doctor didn’t find anything abnormal about her, he suggested counseling for shyness. Zoe never got actual help for her problem. She continued to travel and pursue her modeling career. When she was in Edinburgh, Scotland for the annual theater festival; she saw a performer that changed her life. His name was Mick and he was a tall mime with white hair and intense black eyebrows.Davis stated on page 53, â€Å"He was the first person she felt she’d ever really seen. † Mick was also the first person she had ever recognized, due to his distinctive features; she realized that when she saw him again at a bar and knew who he was. She was so compelled by this experience that she had to go introduce herself. From the first they met they were madly in love with each other and soon afterwards they were walking down the aisle to get married. One day in their new home, she came across an article about a man named Brad Duchaine and his work with face blindness.It described everything that she has been going through her whole life; symptoms like the incapability to recognize faces, leading to social embarrassment and a sense of isolation. She was overwhelmed with emotion when she read this because it helped explain to her who she was. Bill Choisser is another person who suffers from fact blindness. He thought he was normal because he assumed that nobody saw faces either, however, he slowly figured out that he was abnormal. Choisser grew up to be a lawyer but he had some setbacks due to his condition.As Davis further explains on page 52, â€Å"During the 1970s, as a small-town lawyer in the Illinois Ozarks, he struggled to convince clients that he was competent even though he couldn’t find them in court. He never greeted the judges when he passed them on the street – everyone looked similarly blank to him – and he developed a reputation for arrogance. † Prosopagnosia even affected his family life; he grew distant from his mother. After being fed up with the feeling of emptiness, he left town and wanted to find a way to better his life. He got a job as a number cruncher at a construction firm in San Francisco. This job was good for him because it kept him isolated and he didn’t have to talk to people much. He felt a sense of freedom since his was far away from home, and started to wear colorful bandanas and let his hair grow out. With doing so, his appearance was distinguishable enough to help him recognize himself. With this recent confidence boost, it gave him the confidence to go see doctors. One doctor suggested that he might have emotional problems and referred him to a psychiatrist but no medicine worked. He decided to post a message about his experiences on a Usenet group, which was devoted to people with neurological problems.His subject was â€Å"Trouble Recognizing Faces†, and soon after he got a reply from somebody who had the same issue. Brad Duchaine, an upcoming neuroscientist, struggled to fine a suitable subject for research. One night when he was having dinner with his parents and one of their friends, he talked about how he knew someone who couldn’t recognize faces. Duchaine wanted to find out more so he decided to call their parents. The father that he spoke to referred him to Bill Choisser’s Yahoo group and Web site; where there were a community of people with â€Å"face blindness† chatting online, discussing their issues.This was Duchaine’s big break to become a neuroscientist; seeing how nobody had actually studied the issue. A German doctor had previously named the condition â€Å"prosopagnosia† after observing an army lieutenant who had survived getting hit in the head by shrapnel. After Duchaine contacted Choisser, Choisser agreed to be his first clinical subject. Choisser was tested on his ability to recognize small differences between the same types of objects. Davis states on page 53, â€Å"In one exam, Duchaine asked him to memorize the details of a particular house.Duchaine then showed him 150 pictures of other houses and randomly threw in images of the original. † Choisser was successful in identifying it. After running other tests, it was apparent that the brain’s system for processing faces is separate from its system for discerning other things. Duchaine contacted and tested other people with the same condition and found tons of evidence that supported the fact that they can differentiate objects, just not faces. In 2004, he and Ken Nakayama conducted studies to find out the number of people who suffer from prosopagnosia. They assessed 1,600 people online, giving them face-recognition tests, and found that 32 had severely impaired face recognition. A German researcher also found that 17 out of 680 high school and college students had prosopagnosia as well. If the ratio was consistent, that would mean that nearly 6 million people in the US are face blind. In conclusion, prosopagnosia has a huge impact on people’s lives. For instance, Zoe Hunn, a rapidly rising model, didn’t even know she was beautiful because she couldn’t recognize herself.

Friday, March 6, 2020

Make Mind Maps that Stick with Labels

Make Mind Maps that Stick with Labels Adhesive address or shipping labels come in a variety of shapes and sizes, which makes them ideal for a variety of activities in the classroom.   One way to use labels to encourage critical thinking in the classroom is to have students use labels printed with ideas or topics from a unit of study in order to create mind-maps or diagrams that visually organize information on a topic. The mind-map is an interdisciplinary strategy where a student or group of students build(s) off a single concept or idea: a drama, an element in chemistry, a biography, a vocabulary word, a event in history, a commercial product. The concept or idea is placed in the center of a blank sheet of paper and   representations of other ideas are connected to that central concept are added, branching out in all directions on the page. Teachers can use mind-maps as a review exercise, a formative assessment, or interim assessment tool, by providing students individually or in groups with printed labels and asking students to organize the information in a way that shows relationships. Along with the topics or ideas provided on the labels, teachers can provide a few blanks and ask students to come up their own labels associated with the central idea to add to the mind map. Teachers can vary the exercise according to the the size of the paper that allow a few students (poster size) or a large group of students (wall size) to work collaboratively on the mind-map. In preparing the labels, teachers select words, phrases or symbols from a unit of study that are critical to developing student understanding.    Some interdisciplinary examples: Concepts or ideas on labels for Shakespeare’s play Romeo and Juliet (English Language Arts): Romeo, Juliet, Mercutio, Paris, Nurse, Friar Lawrence, a letter, a ring, Apothecary, Rosaline, â€Å"my only love sprung from my only hate†, â€Å"Two households, both alike in dignity.†Concepts or ideas on labels for a biography on Robert E. Lee (Social Studies): Washington College, West Point Military Academy,Mary Custis, Mexican War, Confederacy, President Lincoln, Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant, Traveller, Harper’s Ferry, Appomattox, the Army of Northern Virginia, Battle of Gettysburg.Concepts or ideas on labels for labels for iron (Chemistry): metal, atomic number, Earths outer and inner core, oxidation states, transitional metal, boiling point, melting point, isotopes, chemical compound(s), industry. Labels can be created in word processing software such as Word, Pages, and Google Docs and printed on products from manufacturers such as Avery or office supply stores. There are hundreds of templates for different sized labels ranging from full sheets 8.5† X 11†, large shipping labels 4.25 x 2.75, medium size labels 2.83 x 2.2, and small address labels 1.5 x 1. For those teachers who cannot afford the labels, there are templates that allow them to create their own without adhesive by using label templates made available by World Label, Co. Another alternative is to use the table feature in a word processing program. Why use labels? Why not have the students simply copy the ideas or concepts from a list onto the blank page? In this strategy providing pre-printed labels assures that all students will have the labels as common elements on each mind-map. There is value in having students compare and contrast the completed mind maps. A gallery walk that allows students to share the final product clearly illustrates the choices each student or groups of students made in organizing their identical labels. For teachers and students alike, this label strategy in creating mind-maps  visually demonstrates the multiple different points of view and learning styles in any class.